Call for special sessions papers

Important dates

Announcement of pre-selected special sessions: 14 June 2018
Paper submissions deadline – abstract & title – Tuesday 4 December 2018
Full paper submissions deadline – Tuesday 11 December 2018
Final list of special sessions and papers: 15 February 2019

Special sessions

The organisers of the International Congress of Phonetic Sciences are delighted to announce the pre-selected special sessions for the Congress. Special sessions cover emerging topics, challenges, interdisciplinary research, or subjects that will foster useful debate in the phonetic sciences. Many of the special sessions relate to the ICPhS themes “Endangered Languages, and Major Language Varieties”.

Special sessions will normally be 1.5 hours. There are three types, with expected formats as follows:

  • Oral: four 15-minute talks, plus 30 minutes for discussion (apart from one double oral session, with six talks).
  • Poster: at least four posters, in a dedicated section of a regular poster session. There will be 1.5 hours to view/discuss the posters (plus others in that session), and 30 minutes for general discussion.
  • Workshop: at least four presenters, with a more open format suitable for discussion of methods/tools (exact format to be determined in consultation with session organisers).

Submissions

Authors are invited to submit papers on original, unpublished research related to the topic of the special session. Papers must meet the same requirements as regular papers for the Congress (see the Call for Papers), and will go through the same double-blind review process. Authors will be asked to indicate on submission if they wish to be considered for a special session.

Special sessions may be cancelled if there are insufficient accepted papers for that session.

Queries

For questions related to a particular special session, please email the contact person for that session listed below. For general queries about the special sessions, please contact icphs2019@arinex.com.au.

Oral Sessions

Theoretical and methodological challenges in L3 phonological acquisition

Organisers
Magdalena Wrembel – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan Poland
magdala@wa.amu.edu.pl
Romana Kopeckova – University of Munster, Munster Germany 

Type
Oral Session

Abstract
Extant findings into the acquisition of third language (L3) phonology report complex patterns of interaction between native and non-native languages. A full account of multiple speech learning and the factors conditioning cross-linguistic influence is still lacking, however. The aim of this special session is thus to address the theoretical and methodological challenges in the study of L3 speech perception and production. Different L3 learners (heritage, bilingual, foreign language learners), methodologies (cross-sectional and longitudinal), and language combinations (Germanic, Romance and Slavic languages) will be pooled in individual papers to shed further light on this under-researched yet prevalent area of phonological acquisition.

Social Priming in Speech Production and Perception

Organisers
Jen HayUniversity of Canterbury
jen.hay@canterbury.ac.nz
Katie Drager
– University of Hawai’i at Mānoa

Type
Oral Session

Abstract
A variety of recent work suggests that socio-contextual factors can automatically affect patterns of speech production and/or perception. Such factors may include the social context of the physical space, the speaker, the listener, or the relationship between these. Methodologically, understanding these issues is crucial, because without this understanding, our experiments may not be fully controlled. Theoretically, a proper understanding of the relationship between socio-contextual factors and phonetic variation is central to models of lexical representation, phonetic detail, speech production and speech perception. We invite talks (15 mins) presenting experimental evidence which directly address this theme.

Modeling Meaning-Bearing Configurations of Prosodic Features

Organisers
Oliver Niebuhr – University of Southern Denmark
olni@sdu.dk
Nigel Ward
University of Texas at El Paso

Type
Oral Session 

Abstract
Languages have multistream patterns of prosodic features — such as pitch range, pitch-movement timing, segmental lengthening, voicing properties, loudnesss, and harmonicity — that occur in specific temporal configurations and directly convey pragmatic or interactional meanings. Many features of such configurations have been analyzed, but we still lack a good understanding of their exact nature, including phenomena of parameter timing and coupling, trade-offs, and differences among speakers and across languages. This special session is a venue for researchers from any perspective to discuss how to discover, characterize and model such prosodic constructions from perspectives of speech production, acoustics, or perception.

From voiced to whispered speech

Organisers
Marzena Żygis Leibniz-Centre General Linguistics (ZAS) & Humboldt University, Berlin
zygis@leibniz-zas.de

Zofia MaliszKTHRoyal Institute of Technology, Stockholm

Type
Oral Session

Abstract
This session aims to bring researchers’ attention to a variety of speech modes used in everyday life. Ranging from voiced speech to different types of semi-whispered speech to fully whispered speech, these modes are used by both healthy and clinical populations. We wish to examine the speech modes from a multimodal perspective and increase the impact of (semi-)whispered speech studies on the development of technical systems such as audio-visual speech synthesis and recognition, as well as on medicine and telecommunications. We invite papers investigating the acoustic, articulatory, gestural and respiratory aspects of these speech modes.

The Perception-Production link for Coarticulation

Organisers
Alan C.L. YuUniversity of Chicago
aclyu@uchicago.edu
Georgia ZellouUniversity of California, Davis

Type
Oral Session

Abstract 
This session will focus on various theoretical and methodological issues concerning the perception-production link for co-articulation, a topic that has remained empirically and theoretically controversial in the literature. The aim is to bring together researchers working in different areas using different methodologies to address a recalcitrant topic that has ramifications for theories of speech representation, processing, and models of sound change. We also aim to increase awareness of the need to develop mathematically explicit models of speech perception and production that can provide a platform to model the link between the two modalities.

Prosody in New Englishes

Organisers 
Elinor PayneUniversity of Oxford
elinor.payne@phon.ox.ac.uk

Olga Maxwell University of Melbourne

Type 
Oral Session 

Abstract 
This session will bring together researchers working on any aspect of prosody in New Englishes (varieties of English that have emerged in former British or US colonies e.g., Nigerian English, Indian English, Singaporean English, Phillipine English). We welcome both papers that report specific research findings and those that consider cross-cutting theoretical issues pertaining to the study of English prosody in diverse multilingual contexts.
Submissions are invited on all topics related to prosody in New Englishes (inter alia):
• Pitch-related, spectral and temporal phenomena
• Methodological challenges and advances
• Theoretical issues concerning typology and contact prosody
• Single variety studies
• Cross-variety comparison
• New Englishes in the diaspora

Dynamics of Vowels in Varieties of English

Organisers
Margaret E. L. RenwickUniversity of Georgia
mrenwick@uga.edu
Ewa JacewiczThe Ohio State University

Type 
Oral Session 

Abstract 
Recent progress in modeling the dynamic specification of vowels, the time-varying inherent spectral information in monophthongs and diphthongs, has improved analytic approaches and spurred new discoveries in sociophonetics, sound change, first and second language acquisition, and forensic phonetics. This session invites papers presenting state-of-the-art techniques for measurement and statistical analysis that characterize, compare, and visualize the dynamics of formant trajectories, and apply these methods to large, rich datasets from all varieties of English, whose most salient distinctions often result from vowel dynamics. These papers enrich our understanding of vowel quality, and facilitate comparison and discussion of best methodological practices.

Phoneticians in partnership with communities in language revitalization and maintenance

Organisers 
Sonya BirdUniversity of Victoria (Victoria BC – Canada)
sbird@uvic.ca

Rosey BillingtonCentre of Excellence for the Dynamics of Language/University of Melbourne (Melbourne VIC, Australia)

Type 
Oral Session 

Abstract 
This special session will focus on what we – phoneticians – can do to help advocate for and support sound-based research as a component of language revitalization and maintenance. Topics of interest include designing and implementing collaborative projects for mutually rewarding outcomes, making documentation work accessible and useful to community members, and building capacity among community members, so that they can undertake their own pronunciation research and teaching. This session aims to further our understanding of the meaningful contributions phoneticians can make, and receive, when working in close partnership with minority and endangered language communities on matters relating to pronunciation.

Speech Perception in Underrepresented Populations

Organisers 
Melissa Baese-BerkUniversity of Oregon 
mbaesebe@uoregon.edu
Melinda FrickeUniversity of Pittsburgh 
Marta Ortega-LlebariaUniversity of Pittsburgh
Amos TeoUniversity of Oregon
Seth WienerCarnegie Mellon University

Type 
Double Oral Session 

Abstract 
Models of speech perception are based primarily on knowledge of how major (largely Western, Indo-European) language varieties are processed. At the same time, interest in collecting and analyzing empirical data from underrepresented languages has increased, and yet there have been few perception experiments in the field. We propose a session to develop collaborations among two sets of researchers: those who do speech perception work in the laboratory and those who do language documentation in the field. We hope to encourage discussion of theoretical, methodological, and ethical issues that will benefit both communities.

Articulatory and acoustic uniformity in phonetic structure

Organisers
Matthew FaytakUniversity of California, Berkeley
mf@berkeley.edu

Eleanor Chodroff  Northwestern University 

Type
Oral Session

Abstract
Phonetic principles such as dispersion, focalization, and articulatory ease have been argued to constrain phonetic variation and speech sound organization. In this session, we highlight an additional principle of uniformity, in which speakers implement a phonological primitive with maximum similarity across series of speech sounds sharing that primitive. Variants of uniformity have been implicated in identical, parallel, or correlated behavior of phonetic output. This session aims to explore the utility of uniformity for analyzing phonetic structure, its potential for explaining phonetic patterns, and its implications for diverse areas such as language/speaker variation, sound change, speech articulation, and substance-based phonology.

Poster Sessions 

Phonetic acquisition in contexts of high phonetic variation: The case of laryngeal contrasts in stops

Organisers
Reiko MazukaRIKEN Center for Brain Science 
mazuka@brain.riken.jp

Mary BeckmanOhio State University

Type
Poster Session

Abstract
Infants and children must learn to perceive and produce the acoustic cues that differentiate phonemes. Yet these cues may vary across prosodic contexts, across speech registers, across social groups defined by region, gender, age, etc. We invite papers describing methods or data gathered in the laboratory or the field that can illuminate how such variation affects young language learners, focusing on cues for laryngeal contrasts in stops. We particularly welcome papers on languages with known variation across generations of speakers, including young contact languages, such as Gurindji Kriol, and languages with sound changes in progress, such as Korean and Japanese

Prosodic and pragmatic features of non-referential co-speech gestures

Organisers
Stefanie Shattuck-HufnagelMIT
sshuf@mit.edu

Pilar PrietoICREA-Universitat
Pompeu FabraBarcelona Spain

Type
Poster Session 

Abstract
The prosodic/pragmatic structure of non-referential co-speech gestures suggest the need for substantial changes in models of speech production, speech perception and speech development, to include co-speech gestures at every level from the pragmatic to the phonetic. Non-referential gestures have been viewed as a homogeneous class, ‘beats’, related to rhythm, but growing evidence suggests a range of non-referential gesture types that contribute to communication in various ways. This requires new approaches to defining and categorizing non-referential gestures, and perhaps a re-conceptualization of the pragmatic/prosodic aspects of gestures, and of the role of prosodic structure as an organizing principle in speech planning.

The phonetic structures of Indigenous languages of South America

Organisers
Martin KohlbergerUniversity of Texas at Austin/Leiden University
m.kohlberger@hum.leidenuniv.nl
Lorena Orjuela SalinasUniversity of Texas at Austin

Type
Poster Session

Abstract
This special session is a venue for researchers to present the most up-to-date phonetic research on endangered South American Indigenous languages. In particular, the session focuses on how researching phonetic structures in native South American languages can inform and enrich phonetic typology as a whole. Furthermore, this session offers a possibility for field phoneticians working on endangered languages to exchange methodological insights given that mainstream practices for collecting phonetic data may not be possible in the small remote communities where many endangered languages are spoken.

Phonetics of contact languages

Organisers
Nicole RosenUniversity of Manitoba
Nicole.Rosen@umanitoba.ca
Jesse StewartUniversity of Saskatchewan

Type
Poster Session

Abstract
This session targets work on the phonetic repercussions of amalgamating two or more sound systems into a single language. From a phonetic stand point, contact language phonology is a complex arrangement of source language phonologies which do not always conform to traditional notions of adaptive dispersion models. Instead we observe near-mergers, overlapping categories, categorical assimilation or maintenance, and overshoot of target categories at the segmental level, in addition to prosodic assimilation, possible preservations of archaic patterns, and innovation at the suprasegmental level. This session aims to investigate sound systems and phonetic processes resulting from situations of intense language contact.

Interacting Channels of Speech – Tune and Text

Organisers
Dr. Timo B. RoettgerNorthwestern University
timo.roettger@northwestern.edu

Prof. Martine GriceUniversity of Cologne

Type
Poster Session

Abstract
Contemporary models of intonation assume that intonation – the tune – and the text that bears it are represented on separate tiers and do not influence each other. However, increasing evidence from unrelated languages points to a dynamic negotiation between these two tiers. This special session aims at bringing together evidence on tonally conditioned segmental processes (lengthening, epenthesis, blocking of devoicing), so as to gain a better understanding of how two meaning-signaling channels of speech, the tune and the text, interact with each other and shape phonological systems.

Workshop Sessions

Quantitative Approaches for Characterizing Atypical Speech

Organisers
Michael ProctorMacquarie University
michael.proctor@mq.edu.au
Martijn WeilingUniversity of Groningen
Mark Tiede  Haskins Laboratories
Lucie Ménard – Université du Québec à Montréal
Christina Hagedorn – College of Staten Island
Eric S. Jackson – New York University

Type
Workshop Session 

Abstract
The aim of this workshop is to review and disseminate current research on methods for measuring, characterizing, and interpreting the phonetic (acoustic and articulatory) properties of atypical and disordered speech. This is important to phoneticians describing more diverse speaker populations, and to clinicians assessing disordered speech. Research in these domains is currently limited by a lack of understanding about the most appropriate ways to characterize these types of speech: which parameters should be measured, and in which ways, to provide insights into atypical speech properties, beyond standard considerations for quantifying and modelling phonetic variability as in any other diverse speaker population.

Interpreting acoustic measurements of voice quality

Organisers
Lisa DavidsonNew York University
lisa.davidson@nyu.edu

Marc GarellekUniversity of California, San Diego

Type
Workshop Session

Abstract
Voice quality plays a role in phonological contrasts of phonation type and tone, prosodic marking, and sociolinguistic indexation. This session will address unanswered questions about the acoustic measurements that have been used to measure voice quality, including: What is the relationship between acoustic measures of voice quality, voice articulation, and perception? How consistent are these measures at capturing categories both across speakers of the same language, and at grouping similar categories across different languages? How do individuals differ in their implementation of voice quality? When judging changes in voice quality, do different listeners rely on the same measures?

Scaling up phonetic analysis for the 21st century: Tools, opportunities, and challenges

Organisers
Jane Stuart-SmithUniversity of Glasgow 
Jane.Stuart-Smith@glasgow.ac.uk
Morgan SondereggerMcGill University 
Yvan RoseMemorial University of Newfoundland

Type
Workshop Session

Abstract
Phonetic research has tended to carry out fine-grained analysis of a few aspects of speech from relatively few languages or dialects. But speech research is now entering its own ‘big data’ revolution, with huge digital collections of transcribed speech, from many different languages. The focus of this special session is to introduce and discuss the opportunities and challenges of large-scale, automated speech analysis for phonetic sciences, by considering freely available software systems which integrate speech database management with automated analyses. The special session will provide a forum for phoneticians to discuss large-scale speech analysis with those working to develop such software.

Computational Approaches for Documenting and Analyzing Oral Languages

Organisers
Laurent BesacierLIG UGA (France)
laurent.besacier@imag.fr

Alexis MichaudLACITO CNRS (France)
Martine Adda-DeckerLPP CNRS (France)
Gilles AddaLIMSI CNRS (France)
Steven BirdCDU (Australia)
Graham NeubigCMU (USA)
François PellegrinoDDL CNRS (France)
Sakriani SaktiNAIST (Japan)
Mark Van de VeldeLLACAN CNRS (France)

Type
Workshop Session 

Abstract
This special session is dedicated to computational approaches for documenting and analyzing oral languages (spoken vernacular languages which depend on oral transmission, including endangered languages and regional varieties of major languages). This special session builds on recent works and projects on innovative speech data collection methods as well as on assistance for linguists and local speakers to accelerate collection, transcription and translation of primary language data. The special session will update phoneticians on developments in machine learning which automatically segment, align or label speech collections and will help establish the field of computational language documentation and contribute to its close association with the phonetic sciences.